2014 May be the Year to Find Your Lawyer Online

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Here is an interesting article that notes the paradigm shift taking place in our legal community. The author predicts 2014 as the year that the search for legal services catches up with technology. I would have to agree — the writing is on the wall. A firm’s online presence is more important today than ever  before…

The legal services market is notoriously slow when it comes to adapting to technology. As a result, those in need of lawyers have historically been reluctant to use technology to find them. Think about it. You need a lawyer for your startup. Where do you turn? A friend? A business advisor? Someone else in your personal network? Now there are substantially greater options.Finding your lawyer online will become pervasive in the next 12 months. This is especially good news for entrepreneurs who would benefit from legal advice, but given the friction in the process, may be slow to find it.

Innovation in law has been slowly creeping along since 2001, when LegalZoom was founded to bring legal documents to the public. LegalZoom’s offering of deep discounts on standardized legal documents was transformative to the traditional industry. All of a sudden, consumers who might otherwise have forgone legal formalities had a viable alternative.

But that hasn’t translated to how consumers find and work with actual lawyers. Until now.

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/230614#ixzz2pqHFpbqb

Create, sign and send legally binding agreements in seconds with the Shake App

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Shake App Icon

Every so often, there is an idea so novel and genius that you wonder why you did not think of it yourself. For me, the Shake App is just that. It is a contract writing app that allows individuals to choose from pre-written or custom contract templates to form an agreement. Not only does the app look and operate beautifully; but its utility value is remarkable.

Here is a brief description on iTunes:

Description
Create, sign, and send legally binding agreements in seconds, all from your phone.

  • Hiring a freelancer?
  • Need a nondisclosure agreement (NDA)?
  • Buying something on Craigslist?
  • Loaning money to a friend?
  • Selling or Renting something for your small business?

Getting on the same page with the other person is the best way to avoid disputes down the road. Shake makes it simple to document the important terms and get the deal done quickly and confidently. Making it legal doesn’t have to be complicated!

On any given day, I may toy with approximately three to five iOS/OS apps. And whether discovered while doing my daily blog reading or an app search, I come across interesting and unique concepts often. Given the pure volume of apps that I have tried, it requires quite a bit for an application to stand out; but, the Shake App does just that!

Take a moment to look at the Shake App now. Even if you don’t see an immediate use, download it to have for that “just in case” moment. When you wish you could create a binding agreement or contract on the go…

The Innocent Infringer

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Word cloud for Copyright infringement

Copyright Law is an obscure subject for many. It combines antiquated laws with a myriad of artistic individuals and dares them to gleam from the text its true meaning or intention. The notorious use of mis-leading phrases such as “innocent infringer” furthers the confusion. It leads one to believe that intent is necessary for the infringement of a copyright. When, in actuality, intent is not a determinative element of copyright infringement. In fact, intent in a copyright infringement claim is not a part of the analysis. This article further highlights the misconception.

Section 504(c)(2) of the 1976 Copyright Act provides for an “innocent intent” response to claims of copyright infringement. Its use does not preclude the defendant from being found in violation of copyright infringement, but if found in violation, it allows the court flexibility to reduce statutory damages below the minimum. It is important to note however that proving innocent intent on the part of the defendant is not easy. The Defendant must show that they did not know and that they should not have known that their conduct constituted an infringement. The Defendant’s belief must be both in good faith and reasonable.

A few examples of where “innocent intent” may be found are: 1. Defendant’s work is based upon an infringing work furnished by a third party; and 2. Defendant consciously and intentionally copies from the plaintiff’s work, with a good faith belief that the conduct is not infringing.

Cite: Innocent Infringement – The IT Law Wiki